Thursday, July 16, 2009

How I sew the curve with just one pin........
First I find the center of both pieces and pin them together with the concave piece on top.
Then I go to the end of the seam and baste with a few stitches. This works better than a pin because the fabric always moves when you pull the pin out. This last corner will try to swing out crooked if it isn't attached. This picture was taken with super macro so it looks like a big mismatch at the end of the seam when in reality it is about 1/16th of an inch off.
Then I sew a few stitches at the beginning of the seam and stop with the needle down. Then just smooth the top curve to match the bottom. Sew slowly and use your fingers to hold it in place as it moves into the presser foot.
When you get to the center again stop with the needle down. Hold the basted corner with your right hand and with your left hand just smooth the top piece out to match the bottom piece. I didn't have 2 hands to show this since one was holding the camera.
Once again your fingers will just ride on the fabric holding it in place as it gets sewn.
And there you have it, another block finished.
I was holding the fabric with one hand and the camera with the other hand. I took pictures of the first block but wasn't happy with some of the shots so had to start a second block and retake some of the parts. You may or may not have noticed the top fabric isn't the same in all of the pictures.
Some of the blocks will have strip pieced sections in both parts, some will have plain fabric for one of the parts. Click on Strips and Curves in my Labels list to see all of the quilts made from this type block. When you have pieced sections both top and bottom, you just roll the top piece back 1/4" as you approach each seam and see that it is matching with the seam on the bottom piece. It is just a little slower sewing those blocks.
Today I am meeting some of my students to help them with their fabric choices. Also one lady couldn't make it to the demo so I'll meet briefly with her to explain the pressing procedure that is in the book.

18 comments:

Banaghaisge said...

It is great seeing the evolution through the months - and it is looking ACE with the purple.
Well done that girl!!!
Thanks for showing us.
Hugs,
Jasmine

Beena said...

That makes so much more sense, about basting on the end of a curve which always seems to shift when taking a pin out. Thanks for that great tip!

Joyce said...

Basting the end of the curve will make all the difference. Thanks for the tip.

Unknown said...

That is pretty much the way that I do it too! I just love it and it works well. Hope your class goes well.

Karen - Quilts...etc. said...

Very good tutorial = thanks. I have done curves another way but the end I always have a problem with - I will give your way a try next time.
Karen
http://karensquilting.com/blog/

Janet said...

These hints are right on. I've had to learn these by trial and ERROR by myself. Wish I had made contact with you earlier. To all those who haven't done curves, this tutorial helps.

Vivian said...

Thanks for the photos and tutorial.
It's not as big a controversy as whether or not to prewash fabric, but I see recommendations both ways about which piece to have on top when sewing these curved seams. I've always had the best results the way you do it, with the "crust" on top of the "pie wedge." I get to keep an eye on the larger piece, the one more apt to develop a pucker.
I hope your class continues to go well.

Linda and Michelle said...

Thanks for this! Great info and pics to help me through it!

Cheryl Arkison said...

Love that tip about the basting stitch. I could have used that when I was on my New York Beauty kick.

dagmar.eu said...

Bless you for taking the time to photograph this process. Now I can't wait to have a go. Strange that I can make a princess seam in a blouse without basting but as soon as I get to a Drunkards path block I get in a right old spin. Thank you very much

imquilternity said...

I love the idea of sewing a couple basting stitches at the END of the curve. I have never heard of that before but it's waaaayyyy better than using a pin! You sound like you are an excellent instructor!

Cathi said...

Wow -- you make it look SO easy! Almost tempts me to try it on the sewing machine! :-)

Terri Stegmiller said...

Wonderful tip on adding a few stitches at the end before doing the entire seam. I hope I remember this so I can try it when I need to.

Quiltdivajulie said...

and one more thing (to add to this AWESOME tutorial)... try very hard not to rush ... as soon as you let the stress flow into your fingertips, every thing will go awry!

GREAT how-to photos!

Unknown said...

Excellent tip!!

Anonymous said...

Thanks Wanda~ for another FREE tip. You always make it look so easy with your great tutorials.

Yesterdays posts with ALL the strip seams matching still takes my breath away.

J~MT

Anonymous said...

Hello Wanda, just had a look around and there is only one exclamation for it all - WOW!!!!! The balloon flowers are very similar to the Canterbury Bells. Do they bloom all the way up the stems?

Eva said...

I'd have loved to see picture No 7: What does it look like when you turn the upper part? Will it really be flat? I can't help thinking it becomes a kind of 3D thing... (probably my fault)